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Then and Now: Comparing FBI Active Shooter Stats

From 2011 to 2014, the rate of mass shootings in America tripled. By the end of 2017, things are even worse -- much worse.

From 2011 to 2014, the rate of mass shootings in America tripled. By the end of 2017, things are even worse — much worse. The FBI’s recently published report on Active Shooter Incidents in the U.S. during 2016 and 2017 illuminates these grim results:

Of the five deadliest shootings in American history, three occurred between 2016 and 2017 – including the two deadliest (Las Vegas and Orlando). When comparing 2014 and 2015 to 2016 and 2017, those killed by an active shooter increased 140%. Those injured increased 419%.

We pulled these statistics from three FBI published reports on Active Shooter Incidents in the United States. 2000 to 2013 | 2014 and 2015 | 2016 and 2017

Active Shooter Incidents on the Rise

  • 2016 — 2017: 50 incidents. (30 of these incidents occurred in 2017.)
  • 2014 — 2015: 40 incidents.
  • 2000 to 2013: 160 incidents or an average of 11.4 incidents per year. (4 occurred in the first 7 years, while 16.4 occurred in the last 7 years.)

Casualties on the Rise

  • 2016 — 2017: 221 killed, 722 wounded (Avg.110 killed, 361 wounded)
  • 2014 — 2015: 92 killed, 139 wounded. (Avg. 46 killed, 69 wounded)
  • 2000 to 2013: 486 killed, 557 wounded (Avg. 35 killed, 40 wounded)

Shooter Stopped by Citizens (not Police)

  • 2016 — 2017: 8 stopped by citizens (16% of attacks)
  • 2014 — 2015: 6 stopped by citizens (15% of attacks)
  • 2000 to 2013: 21 stopped by citizens (13% of attacks)

The latest FBI report concludes, “The enhanced threat posed by active shooters and the swiftness with which active shooter incidents unfold support the importance of preparation by law enforcement officers and citizens alike.”

Though your chances of encountering an active shooter are extremely rare, the consequences can be devastating. As the numbers continue to climb, it is important to be comfortably aware of your surroundings, and if attacked, to always be an active participant in their own survival.

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